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CDC Trainings Provide a Host of Continuing Education Opportunities for CHES® and MCHES®

CDC’s core mission is to increase the health security of our nation, conducting critical science and providing health information that protects our country against global disease threats. In addition, CDC pledges to provide a benefit to society as a whole through creating an environment for intellectual and personal growth, which includes the training of our public health workforce.

CDC’s Training and Continuing Education Online (TCEO) is a system that provides the public health and healthcare workforce access to CDC educational activities that offer free continuing education contact hours (CECH) for CHES®, and more recently, advanced-level MCHES® credits as well as Continuing Competency credits, a newer requirement for recertification.

Figure 1. CDC’s Accreditation and Compliance Team, picture taken pre-COVID-19. From left to right: Wanda Carter-Calhoun (Chenega), Lynn Willis (Chenega), Lutrisha King, Abigail Luc, Courtney Lee, Team Lead, Oksana Bilukha (Chenega), Yoshika Eason (Chenega), Not pictured: Sara Critchley, Deborah Ornelas, Cynthia Hill (Chenega), and Ann Wells “Throughout my CDC career I have maintained my CHES® credential, which I obtained at the end of 2001. I’ve never had difficulty getting enough continuing education credits. And lately I’ve been considering that it’s time to make the move and become an MCHES®.”

~Susie McCarthy, CHES®, Public Health Advisor at CDC

Gabrielle (Gaby) Benenson is the Chief of CDC’s Education and Training Services Branch. Through the work of two teams  in her branch, CDC offers ~100 new educational activities a year that are approved for CHES® credits, as well as some advanced-level MCHES® credits. Gaby’s branch consists of educators designated to support curriculum development, instructional design, training systems, and promotion of learning opportunities, including of course, COVID-19 resources and trainings.  CDC has seen unprecedented numbers of individuals seeking education opportunities in the areas of COVID-19 and vaccine trainings. In January 2021, they saw a 250% increase from January 2020 in learners earning continuing education.instructional design, training systems, and promotion ofFigure 2. CDC’s Training Delivery Team, picture taken pre-COVID-19. From left to right top row: Melissa Locket, Mia Hill (Chenega), Katie Arseniadis, Tennille Clayton (ICF). From left to right bottom row: Rhonda Willis, Molly Kellum, Team Lead, Quashawnda Berry. Not pictured: Beverly Bush (Chenega), Vanda Alexander (Chenega), Dorothy Jones (Chenega), Carolyn West Collier, Briana Hill (Chenega), Karlastrina Pettigrew (Chenega), Latasha Bankston, and Rhiannon Ross (Public Health Foundation). learning opportunities, including of course, COVID-19 resources and trainings.  CDC has seen unprecedented numbers of individuals seeking education opportunities in the areas of COVID-19 and vaccine trainings. In January 2021, they saw a 250% increase from January 2020 in learners earning continuing education.

Gaby is pleased to report that CDC’s continuing education learning opportunities are free of cost to the individual. To utilize the TCEO system, there are some simple steps for CHES® and MCHES® to follow:

  1. Navigate to www.cdc.gov/getCE
  2. Create an account. (You must be registered to earn CE).
  3. Visit Search Courses to find the course of your choice. You can search by CHES or MCHES to ensure that CECH is awarded for your course.
  4. Scroll down and click on the title of the course.
  5. Review the information on the Course Summary page and click Continue.
  6. If prompted, enter in the Course Code or Verification Code in the Course Access Code box. (Hint: these codes are provided by the course instructor or may be found in the course materials)
  7. Choose the type of continuing education you’d like to earn. (You can select more than one if you hold additional certifications).
  8. Under Pending CE on the My Activities page, click on the course Evaluation and complete it. If you attended a conference, there may be more than one evaluation you will need to complete (or in some cases, a post-test).  You will be returned to the My Activities page.
  9. Visit the Completed CE section of the My Activities page to download or print your certificate(s). Note that you do not need to submit these certificates to NCHEC, as CDC is a Category I provider, and credits will be reported for you.

“My involvement with leading our Education and Training Services Branch has helped me to understand the need for and significance of health education credentialing,” said Gaby. “Certification shows a focus on the investment of continued growth and continued competency, and how a professional is keeping up during rapidly evolving times.”

CDC helps public health and healthcare professionals stay informed about a variety of quality trainings from federal agencies or federally funded partners through a website, e-newsletter, social media, and partner outreach.

 

Posted by Jessica Wessner at 14:37

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